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Research

Religious Identities and the Race Against the Virus

Successes and Opportunities for Engaging Faith Communities on COVID-19 Vaccination

Wave 2

Published: July 27, 2021

Wave 2

The Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) and  Interfaith America (IA) released a survey on July 27, 2021, expanding on findings from the March 2021 PRRI–IA Religion and the Vaccine Survey. Together, these PRRI–IA surveys show that faith-based approaches continue to offer opportunities to encourage vaccination.

This survey shows that vaccine hesitancy has decreased among all Americans, including across all religious and demographic subgroups. However, the survey also shows that barriers to vaccine access, such as time constraints, concerns about side effects, and lack of reliable transportation, have discouraged some from getting vaccinated, especially among communities of color and younger Americans.

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PRRI-IA Research

Keep Learning

What are key dividing factors in vaccine attitudes? Do Americans see a conflict between their religious beliefs and COVID-19 vaccination? Dive into the next two reports in the PRRI-IA survey series to find out.

Wave 1 Wave 3

It’s absolutely clear that faith-oriented, faith-sensitive ambassador and community health worker approaches have been an important part of vaccine uptake.

— Eboo Patel, IA Founder and President

Interfaith America, 141 W. Jackson Blvd, Suite 3200, Chicago, IL 60604, US

© 2022 Interfaith America

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