John Lewis (right), Hosea William, Albert Turner and Bob Mants leading marchers over the Edmund Pettus Bridge on Bloody Sunday, 1965. Photo courtesy of National Archives at College Park.

John Lewis (right), Hosea William, Albert Turner and Bob Mants leading marchers over the Edmund Pettus Bridge on Bloody Sunday, 1965. Photo courtesy of National Archives at College Park.

Racial Equity

Commemorating Bloody Sunday: The Vote Is Sacred

March 4, 2022

The Rev. Fred Davie and former U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch at the 50th anniversary commemoration. Photo courtesy of Rev. Davie

The Rev. Fred Davie and former U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch at the 50th anniversary commemoration. Photo courtesy of Rev. Davie

“Because of campaigns like this, a Voting Rights Act was passed. Political and economic and social barriers came down. And the change these men and women wrought is visible here today in the presence of African Americans who run boardrooms, who sit on the bench, who serve in elected office from small towns to big cities; from the Congressional Black Caucus all the way to the Oval Office.”

Top left: Alabama police attack Selma to Montgomery marchers, known as

Top left: Alabama police attack Selma to Montgomery marchers, known as “Bloody Sunday,” in 1965. Top right: Marchers carrying banner “We march with Selma!” on street in Harlem, New York City, New York in 1965. Bottom left: Participants in the Selma to Montgomery march in Alabama during 1965. Bottom right: Dr. Martin Luther King, Dr. Ralph David Abernathy, their families, and others leading the Selma to Montgomery march in 1965. Mitchumch/Wikimedia Commons

Latest Articles

Interfaith America, 141 W. Jackson Blvd, Suite 3200, Chicago, IL 60604, US

© 2022 Interfaith America